Unlocking the Air Raid DNA

AirRaidIf you are intested in learning about the Air Raid Offense, we highly recommend our CoachTube course “Unlocking the Air Raid DNA” by Coach Slade Singleton.  In this course Coach Singleton breaks down the Air Raid Offense and how to keep defensive players in constant conflict.  Coach Singleton covers in detail Building and Calling the Offense, Formations, Pass Protection, Attack Zones, Pass Concepts, Screen Game, Run Game, RPOs, Motions, and Tags.  Here is what some coaches are saying about the course:

“This Air Raid video by Coach Singleton is great. He goes over his offense in incredible detail. I have picked up some passes, runs, and RPO tags I’m going to install in the upcoming season. Great work coach, and can’t wait to see what you release next.”

“This course is a must buy for any Airraid enthusiast. Whether you are a seasoned coach or just starting your coaching journey there is something that everyone can take away from here. Coach is very clear on what each play is trying to do and where the read man is. It does a good job of breaking the Airraid down to the core plays and showing you how to work out after that. Overall a great buy!”

“Great course for anyone looking into the Air Raid. I would recommend this to anyone wanting to install this as there base offense or someone just trying to add a few wrinkles for the upcoming season.” 

“Excellent job. A lot of information!”

“Coach Singleton’s Unlocking the Air Raid DNA is an incredible coaching tool for any coach who is studying or wants to study the Air Raid offense. I highly recommend this Course!!!”

“Coach Singleton has created a masterpiece. Unlocking the Air Raid DNA is a comprehensive dive into the world of an Air Raid OC. Coach Singleton explains his concepts very clearly. Making even the most conservative “run first” coach confident that he can air it out using these concepts. Thank you coach for all that you do for the Air Raid and Spread community.”

If interested, you can register for this Course at the following link:

Unlocking the Air Raid DNA – Coach Singleton

Rule of 4

Rule of 4We just published a new Course on CoachTube from Coach Slade Singleton called the “Rule of 4“.  In this course Coach Singleton will describe a simple offensive system he has used successfully at the High School level.  Using this system he has simplified the learning curve for his players helping them to execute at a fast pace.  Here is what some coaches are saying about the course:

“What Coach Singleton has done with his “Rule of 4”, can help any coach improve their offensive output. This is a great way to streamline your offense and tailor your offense around what your team can be successful with. With any no huddle tempo offense you want the ability to have your players play fast but also be able to window dress what you do. The “Rule of 4”, is a tool that can make this happen. The detail that is being spoke on in this course is worth every penny and I will incorporate the “Rule of 4″ into my system moving forward. Thank you coach for putting together a great product!”

“Coaches, this is a MUST!!! It’s simple and concise. Installing your offense doesn’t have to be complicated. Your kids, your offense and your program will benefit from this course.”

“Coach Singleton does a great job explaining the hows & whys of his system. Clear and concise. Best $ I have spent on football in a long time. Keep up the good work Coach!”

“Coach Singleton has done it again. He has created a course that simplifies your offense while increasing your points. This course shows you how you don’t need 1,000 plays in order to be successful. All you need is a couple of plays that you need to rep and your scoring will go through the roof. This is an amazing course that I think everyone should get.”

“Love how Coach Singleton made all concepts simple to understand. Whether you have coached for 1 or 10 years it is easy to follow. Keep up the great work Coach!”

“Coach Singleton does a great job of simplifying spread concepts. His rule of 4 is helpful in trying to simplify your offense for your kids in order to play faster, but also gives you answers to what the defense is trying to do. I would recommend any coach looking to simplify their offense in order to play faster check out this course. Nice work Coach!”

If interested, you can register for this Course at the following link:

Rule of 4 – Coach Singleton

Business Leadership Principles

Business Leadership Principles
as a Youth Coach

 

Leadership

Coaches-Clinic.com has long been a leader as a youth coach resource and that’s largely due to the coaches we use.  For example, Coach Early not only coached youth football in Colorado for four years but also coached four seasons of flag football, two seasons as a high school referee, was a presenter at a national youth coaching conference as well as providing some of the earlier content for us.  Coaches-Clinic.com coaches are not just volunteers but coaches committed to coaching.

Coach Early’s new book “Business Leadership Principles as a Volunteer Youth Coach” is available on Amazon.com.  His tribute to volunteer coaches like you drives home what Coaches-Clinic.com coaches already know: When you volunteer to coach, you’re going to have fun and you’re going to develop skills that are meaningful in the workplace.

Dumcoach Clinic

Dumcoach.com Clinic

Series of Youth Football Clinics

 

Our Dumcoach.com Online Clinic on Saturday, 6/3 was a great success and we have now made the clinic recordings available for viewing.  This is a great opportunity to learn from several great coaches from the comfort of your home.  The cost for the clinic series is just $12.49.  If you are a youth coach and are not familiar with Clark Wilkins and the Dumcoach Forum, we highly recommend that you visit the site and look around.  We feel it is one of the best resources for youth football.  Be careful though it can become addicting!  Below is our Coach and Topic lineup:

Coach Topic
Bruce Eien Simple Passing Concepts
Clint Schumacher Managing the Parents
Dave Potter Turnovers by Design
Keith Magee Non-Contact Drills for the Offseason
Mike Rowe Installing Tempo at all Levels
Tito Correa Formational Designation

Click Here to Register:

Dumcoach.com Clinic

 

Youth Football Playbook

Youth Football Playbook

(Must have Youth Football Plays)

 

If you are a frequent visitor to our site you may have seen our article about Essential Youth Football Plays where we described both the Power and Counter plays and why we believe they should be a part of any youth football playbook.   We later followed that article up with a post describing ways to use formations to get more Power in the Power Running Play.  Recently we watched as several coaches shared their favorite Power and Counter plays on Twitter and we thought it might be worthwhile to gather all their tweets in one place and share with other coaches.

If you are interested in learning more about the Power and Counter concepts, you should take a look at our Multiple Ways to Run the Power Concept and Counter in the Youth Game clinics.

Tackling Circuit

Tackling Circuit

(Improving Your Youth Football Defense)

 

We believe that many of us would agree that the best defense in youth football is one that can tackle.  After getting the fundamentals of tackling down, we think that a tackling circuit is a great addition to any practice plan.  It allows you to get a maximum number of reps in a relative short period of time by splitting up into small groups and running multiple drills at the same time.  Concerning groups, we suggest that you create them with size and abilities in mind. Also, to save time and possibly even frustration we suggest that you know what the groups will be prior to your practice so that you don’t have to waste time splitting your players up.

If you are looking for drills to incorporate in your circuit, we recommend that you take a look at the following links:

Coachsomebody.com Every Day Drills
Glazier Clinics Tackling Circuit
Coaches-Clinic.com Tackling Drills Library
CLYFL Youth Football Drill Book
Winningyouthfootball.com

Teaching Skills

Teaching Skills

4 things you should NEVER do

By Greg Robinson

Program Setup Coordinator I Youth Football

 

Skills Training1.  Make a player feel bad about not successfully executing the drill/activity:

I wish I could give you a penny for every time a coach gets negative on kids. Have you heard these: “Come on Tommy! You’re killin us!” “We can’t win if you don’t catch the ball.” “You took your eyes off the ball!”

Remember, you are dealing with very fragile egos and confidence levels. Always be the encourager!

2.  Don’t assume the drill you are running is age or skill appropriate:

As an example, let’s say you are having the kids try to catch the ball before going out of bounds. This a very athletic task. If your players are only catching the ball 70-80% of the time just standing there, the success rate of trying to catch the ball heading out of bounds is going to be less than 50%. If you continue to permit this dropped pass rate at your practices, soon your players won’t even want to TRY to catch.

3.  Don’t worry about the details:

Yes, I think that is a double negative but you NEED to worry about the details. How do you get better at something? “Practice!” But make sure you are practicing the correct things. If you want your players to catch the ball at higher percentages, you must break down what happens when the player actually drops it. Are his hands or elbows too wide? What is he looking at when the ball comes to him? Are his pinkies or thumbs together? Is his confidence so low he is turning his head?

Do not continue to let your players fail at the drill without analyzing why they are failing. Break it down into small parts.

4.  Treat every player the same:

Shouldn’t I treat every player the same? Not in skill training. Every group you teach will be different. Very rarely will all of your players be at the same level. Do not make other players feel bad about their skills at the expense of trying to improve your best players. However, your goal should be to challenge every player, at his individual skill level. You can do this by splitting the group or making a drill more challenging for skilled players.

There is nothing wrong with telling your players that once you get good at this part of the drill (whatever that may be), you can graduate to more difficult steps/levels in the drill. Examples of making a football catching drill more difficult would be things like: catching with one hand, running a difficult route before making the catch, or doing pushups before the catch.

Coaching Addiction

Warning!

Prolonged Exposure to Coaching can become Addictive

 

Danger SignThis past weekend I had the pleasure of traveling to Minnesota to meet with Coach Mike Rowe and in the process, see his Rocori Spartans play in the State High School 4A Semifinals in US Bank Stadium.  The Spartans quickly found themselves down 14 points early in the 1st quarter.  With so many things going wrong they continued to fight to the point that they held the lead until the final 1:21 of the 4th quarter.   Having gotten to know Coach Rowe over the last 4 years, I have no doubt his team’s resiliency in large part was a byproduct of his Character Program.  The Spartans ultimately ended up losing and in defeat Coach Rowe perfectly summed up how I feel as a youth coach after a tough season ending loss.

“So proud of these young men and how they handle adversity. Came up short today, but the loss is not why I am sad. All I ever want is one more day to coach these kids and hangout with my coaching peers.”

Getting a chance to watch our young players grow, become more confident, and to learn to fight through adversity are some of the most rewarding parts of being a youth coach.  Adding in the opportunity to build relationships with other coaches coaching can become quite addictive.

Youth Basketball Practice Plan – Part 2

Youth Basketball Practice Plan – Part 2

“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” – Antoine de Saint-Exupery

 

Basketball PracticeWith the new basketball season upon us we thought we should expand on one of our previous posts concerning Youth Basketball Practice Planning and provide details on how we build our practice plans.  First, we determine what areas we want to focus on in every practice.  Like many Youth Basketball teams, we have limited practice and gym time so we know we can’t be great at everything.  Thus, we narrow our focus to 3 areas. For our teams that means attacking the basket off the break, defense, and rebounding.  If we do nothing else in a practice, we are going to work on those 3 areas.  Next we like to prioritize what other areas we want to focus on.  For example, half-court offense, out of bounds plays, press break, etc.  We then build our schedule in 5 – 10 minute segments.  It is worth noting that at times when we are introducing a concept or drill, we may go longer than 5 or 10 minutes, but we strive to go no longer than 20 minutes.  Below is a sample of the format we have used that has worked well for us over the years:

Wall Time Duration Drill Notes Drill Example Coach
7:30 PM 5 Defensive Closeout (No Ball) Coaching Points https://youtu.be/6iHZPCNR6Ac Coach

Wall Time

We include Wall Time help us keep on schedule.  As much as we plan and try to stay on plan, there are times where we might get off script.  When this happens and we want to get back on schedule we use Wall Time to simply determine where in practice we need to be.

Duration

Duration is simply the number of minutes we are planning for that portion of the practice.  Again, we strive to keep these in 5 to 10 minute segments wherever possible.

Drill

The name we use to refer to the Drill.

Notes

We use the Notes section for any Coaching Points we may want to emphasize for that Drill.

Drill Example

Video link showing an example of the Drill.

Coach

Coach assigned to running the Drill.

 

To further illustrate we have included a complete Sample of one of our early season practice plans:

Fullscreen Mode

If you are curious to learn more about the system we use, we encourage you take a look at our Attack the Tin System. If you need more drill ideas, we recommend you visit our library of youth basketball drills.

Helmet Award System for Youth Football

Helmet Award System for Youth Football

 

Helmet Award SystemAs a youth football player, I loved receiving recognition in the way of helmet stickers.  What I didn’t like as a lineman was the disparity between awards for “unskilled” verses “skilled” positions.  One of my most vivid memories as a youth football player was our Quarterback receiving 7 stickers for scoring 7 touchdowns in one game and all I received for blocking for him on each of those scores was 1.  Because of this experience we came up with the following Helmet Award System to be more team focused and recognize the contributions of all players:

Offense

Team

  • Score on the First Series of the game.
  • Score on the First Series of the second half.
  • Score 21 points or more.
  • No Turnovers
  • Victory

Lineman

  • Every wedge play that goes for 10 yards or more.

Individual

  • Center

    • Perfect Snaps
  • Receiver/Running Back

    • Pass Catch
  • Running Back

    • Pass Completion
    • Tackled while carrying out fake.
  • ALL

    • Defender legally blocked to the ground.

Defense

Team

  • Only allow 7 points or less.

Individual

  • Force a fumble
  • Fumble recovery
  • Interception
  • Tackle behind the line of scrimmage.

Special Teams

Team

  • Punt Block
  • Extra Point Block
  • Kickoff return for a Touchdown.
  • Punt return for a Touchdown.

Individual

  • Force a fumble
  • Fumble recovery

If you like us love to give out Awards to your team and are looking for high quality Helmet Stickers, we highly suggest you visit our friends at SportsLiveDecals.com.

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